THE SAGGING SAGA

THE SAGGING SAGA

BY
SANNI KAY. YUSUF

The origin of sagging suffices a reason to despise the nonsensical style. The manner in which the style is carried out is enough a factor to shun the rubbish. The calibre of fellows the dress is common with is enough a propellant to distance oneself from the apparent trash. But it is seriously worrying that Nigerians may never cease to embrace anything that has its root from the west without sieving its rationale.

Placing the trousers’ band (the belt area) beneath the waist, paving the way for the undergarment (which is supposed to be uncompromisingly hidden) to be freely visualised by all and sundry is an act detestable by common logic. Until sagging broke out from some American prisoners a few years ago, wearing the trousers firmly to the waist and keeping undercloth from people’s view used to be a universal morality. How on earth is it reasoning-friendly that criminals whose trousers could not match up with their wastes on account of reduction in body structure become dressing models? What could possibly be wrong with youths and parents who acquire such for their growing children?

Sagging isn’t a dress-style that fits the wearer. Any rational person will attest to the truism that it does disfigure rather than adorn the body. The wearer consistently, repeatedly battles with driving it up because it is not normally, reasonably worn.

It further baffles that those whose undergarments -pants, boxer-shorts – are usually extremely, penalisably dirty, too, do take to sagging. Palapala ilu apala!!! If they cover them up, who will be privy to their unkempt life? What do we call that? Severe stupidity!

The most excruciating is the involvement of ladies. I wonder how a lady who, by African standard, should jealously, meticulously, religiously keep her underwear from the reach of the opposite gender, will expose same in the insane name of sagging. That’s worrying.

3,815 total views, 0 views today

Comments

comments

Leave a comment